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The Longest Way

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The Longest Way

Directed by Christoph Rehage. With Christoph Rehage. This is a time-lapse, made up of roughly photographs, depicting a one-year walk from Beijing to​. The Longest Way on totalsynthesis.eu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Longest Way. THE LONGEST WAY. Kilometer zu Fuss durch China. Zum Geburtstag macht sich Christoph Rehage selbst das schönste Geschenk: Nach seinem.

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Mittlerweile 10 Millionen Zuschauer verfolgten Christoph Rehages Video über seinen Weg zu Fuß durch China auf YouTube und Vimeo. Zum Geburtstag macht sich Christoph Rehage selbst das schönste Geschenk: Nach seinem Studium in Peking bricht er. The Longest Way: Kilometer zu Fuß durch China | Rehage, Christoph | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. The Longest Way on totalsynthesis.eu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Longest Way. The Longest Way: Kilometer zu Fuß durch China. Zu seinem Geburtstag macht sich Christoph Rehage selbst das schönste Geschenk: Von Beijing aus. Christoph Rehages Buch "The Longest Way" erzählt von einer Wanderung durch China, von Peking bis nach Ürümqi, im Jahr Directed by Christoph Rehage. With Christoph Rehage. This is a time-lapse, made up of roughly photographs, depicting a one-year walk from Beijing to​. Er erlangte große Bekanntheit mit dem Internetvideo The Longest Way, welches er über seine Wanderung von Peking nach Ürümtschi drehte. Inhaltsverzeichnis.

The Longest Way

The longest Way - Kilometer zu Fuß durch China book. Read 14 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Mit 30 Kilo Ausrüstung und eine. Christoph Rehages Buch "The Longest Way" erzählt von einer Wanderung durch China, von Peking bis nach Ürümqi, im Jahr Er erlangte große Bekanntheit mit dem Internetvideo The Longest Way, welches er über seine Wanderung von Peking nach Ürümtschi drehte. Inhaltsverzeichnis.

The book itself seems to reflect some of those intimacy-and-boundaries struggles. Jan 02, Greg Baerg rated it it was amazing.

I didn't know that Andrew McCarthy was a travel writer until a friend read a feature he wrote about an unconventional stay in Paris.

She recommended the book to me and I am grateful. As the title suggests, it is more than a travel book -- indeed, it isn't a travel book, at all.

It is a heartwarming story about a man coming to grips with who he has been and who is becoming, and the journey that got him there and which continues.

At this point of my life, it spoke to me, and I found myself highlig I didn't know that Andrew McCarthy was a travel writer until a friend read a feature he wrote about an unconventional stay in Paris.

At this point of my life, it spoke to me, and I found myself highlighting passages and really wanting to know how his story unfolded, rather than ended.

There is more, of course, that means more to me than probably most, like how he is a divorced man with a young son, figuring out how that dynamic works in a new relationship.

It was hopeful. And as an aside, I read the Kindle edition and was pleasantly surprised that all the photos and there weren't that many, really were at the end.

While they were brief and not "travel" photos in the least, I appreciated being able to use his rather vivid and unique descriptions to visualize each stop, rather than have a photo paint the picture for me.

I am thankful to my friend for the recommendation and can't wait to discuss this book with her, once her journey brings us together again.

Dec 03, Megan rated it did not like it. I was surprised to find out Andrew McCarthy was a travel writer. After reading pages of this book I am shocked he is a travel writer.

I love reading about people traveling to far away places and seeing amazing things. So while the author travels to cool places the way he writes gave it no life for me and I found myself skipping through the pages hoping to get to something interesting.

As for his relationship with D, there was nothing in it to make me root for them. At pages what I know about D through his eyes is: she doesn't like living in NY and complains about it often, she enjoys to socialize and doesn't understand why he doesn't causing a point of constant friction, and he has given up trying to understand her train of thought when she sees signs in things because it is not rational.

The relationship was so volatile that his son from a previous marriage didn't want to visit. Seriously, everytime he spoke of D, I felt like he was rolling his eyes at her.

Oct 03, Larry H rated it really liked it. I'm not at all ashamed to admit that I was first drawn to Andrew McCarthy's new book because he starred in two of my favorite 80s movies, St.

Elmo's Fire and Pretty in Pink. The truth is, however, about a year or so ago I read an article he wrote on Ireland for Bon Appetit magazine, and I remembered being impressed with his writing ability.

While I may have come to McCarthy's book partially because of my nostalgia for most 80s-related things, it was his writing ability, and his insights into the I'm not at all ashamed to admit that I was first drawn to Andrew McCarthy's new book because he starred in two of my favorite 80s movies, St.

While I may have come to McCarthy's book partially because of my nostalgia for most 80s-related things, it was his writing ability, and his insights into the appeal of travel and why he is more comfortable being alone—even while surrounded by strangers—that made me keep reading.

But don't be taken in by the quote from Elizabeth Gilbert on the book's cover—while McCarthy meditates on love and relationships, and does eat throughout the book, this is no male version of Eat, Pray, Love.

He recounts always being a somewhat ambivalent person; while he initially fell in love with acting in high school and felt truly alive onstage, he never really imagined himself a successful actor, and once his career started taking off, he found himself at odds with this success.

It's interesting to find out the characteristics that most intrigued me about McCarthy's acting—his ambivalence, his vulnerability, his shyness—were actually real-life personality traits, not dimensions of his characters.

At one point he recounts that he saw acting as a terrific way to meet women, travel, and drink to excess. At a crossroads in his life, and at risk of jeopardizing his future by alienating the woman he loves, he sets out to try and find the answer to what causes his fear of commitment, of showing his true self to people.

He begins traveling to places both exotic and remote—the glaciers of Patagonia, the rainforests of Costa Rica, the heart of Amazonian country, Mt.

Kilimanjaro, even one of his best friend's childhood hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. This book is part travelogue, as he shares risky adventures, breathtaking sights, and encounters both enriching and bizarre with the people he meets along his journey, and part memoir of self-discovery.

McCarthy says, "In life there are dividing lines. These moments become a way to chart our time; they are the signposts for our lives.

Andrew McCarthy is a writer with great talent, one who truly made the anecdotes of his travels come alive, and his use of imagery really evoked pictures in my mind.

But at times, McCarthy's ambivalence, his reticence to disclose his feelings, even to the woman he loves, was a little frustrating.

You almost want to shake him from time to time, to warn him he needs to find his answers quickly or his whole life could fall apart.

That melodrama aside, this is an insightful, enjoyable book that makes you see travel, and why people do it, in a very different way.

Jan 13, Heather rated it it was ok Shelves: This is a pretty self-indulgent and repetitive look at McCarthy's journey to finally marrying the mother of one of his children.

While there's a good concept here--him running away in search of something and finding that he has what he needs and wants at home--he never actually digs deep enough to make the reader care.

He repeats over and over and over how he craves solitude, how he has always felt apart from people, how he is embarrassed by his own and other people's shame.

But rather than en This is a pretty self-indulgent and repetitive look at McCarthy's journey to finally marrying the mother of one of his children.

Each insight is kind of half-formed, which makes me think he didn't really learn anything, just got lucky in finding the right people to indulge him.

More like 3. There are travel sections that make me want to visit the place the next day. There are deep insightful sections that make me want to write down each word of wisdom to read everyday.

There are pages about family that make me want to put the book down and go hug my wife and kids. There are sections that bored the heck out of me.

However, the others far outweigh the More like 3. However, the others far outweigh the slow parts. McCarthy, as an author, is a great surprise.

I recommend it anyone who likes to travel but has frequently asked the question why. The book is really an introspective look at his withdrawal from life and the use of travel as a means to try to understand himself and deal with his problems.

I think my greatest frustration was the description of his second wedding. Weeks before his Irish wedding, he takes off on travel assignments to Patagonia and the Amazon, arriving just days before leaving for Ireland.

Planning is clearly not one of his strengths, preferring a seat-of-the-pants approach to life and travel. To be fair, the craziness of planning deficiencies was shared equally by both he and his wife!

Aug 19, Anna Janelle rated it really liked it Shelves: first-reads , advanced-reader-copy. My previous status updates seem to encompass many of the gut-reactions that I've had to this book.

I was pleasantly surprised to discover how well Andrew McCarthy can spin a tale. He's a wonderfully gifted writer who possesses the ability to really draw the reader in to reassess and re-evaluate what it means to become an adult member of a committed relationship.

While McCarthy was primarily known as an celebrated "Brat Pack" actor in the s, he is now a celebrated travel author, acting as edi My previous status updates seem to encompass many of the gut-reactions that I've had to this book.

While McCarthy was primarily known as an celebrated "Brat Pack" actor in the s, he is now a celebrated travel author, acting as editor-at-large for the National Geographic Traveler.

While this book was advertised as a travel memoir, it became, for me, most importantly, a memoir discussing McCarthy's fears and inhibitions regarding his second marriage.

I found myself most emotionally connected to his memories centering around his unresolved issues with his family - in particular, his father. I found McCarthy to be most profound and moving when illustrating his family dynamic - as opposed to discussing the exotic scenery of an exotic locale.

The travel narrative serves a purpose in that it prompts McCarthy's inner dialogue and self-revelation. As a reader new to the travel genre, this was a perfect manner in which to get my feet wet while combining the narrative with memoir or autobiography, a genre which I am most familiar.

It's a very personal encounter with issues and questions that plague us all as we transition from youth into adulthood.

As a person currently struggling to plan a wedding like McCarthy and his betrothed D. It was a quick, relatively short read that I thoroughly enjoyed.

Who would have thought this cutie would have grown up to be a man with such insight into affection and self-knowledge? Respectfully, I was very surprised at the quality and emotional-impact of his insight.

A very welcome surprise indeed Oct 31, Gatamadrizgmail. He has been with D for seven years, they have a daughter and everything should be fine, right?

But the minute they decide to get married he is off and running. Painfully shy and a bit socially inept, he is honest that he uses travel to avoid getting to know people.

But travel also gives him the opportunity to take a real look at himself. So this book balances between an intimate look at where this man is at, and a tautly written, imaginative travelogue.

He travels to Argentina and walks the glaciers, to Costa Rica, boats down the Amazon and eventually climbs Mt. But the reader gets it.

You really feel for him, for his incredibly patient wife. You laugh at the foibles of travel, and especially traveling with kids. The descriptions of the places are spectacular - I found myself googling images of Calafate in Argentina, for example and immediately wanted to go there.

Memories of his living in Vienna and Dublin, his times as the Movie Star are woven into his journeys. McCarthy is an award-winning travel writer, and it shows in the imagery.

When he finally comes to the realization that he does not need this crutch anymore, that he wants to be back in New York with his wife and children, he is on top of Mt.

Kilimanjaro you want to cheer. The final scene of him dancing wildly at his wedding, free of his self-doubts, enjoying himself with people for the first time in his life is moving and wonderful.

I cannot say enough about this book. Andrew McCarthy has transformed himself from Brat Pack actor to travel writer.

His work has received some high honors. I was aware of his work in National Geographic Traveller, so I picked up this book.

And I was disappointed. He writes more of his own neurotic journey to adulthood and commitment than he does of actual travel. In this book, he travels to escape his responsibilities and his ennui.

And he travels to boring rat-trap towns. I had no desire to visit Patagonia or Costa Rica when he was finished. His descriptive writing is bland. And the book ends in Dublin, a place fraught with meaning for him, with his wedding, and I have no sense of place there, either.

Likewise with his journey to the Amazon. His writing about a family trip to Vienna was much more vivid, which is ironic, since McCarthy constantly extols the virtues of traveling alone and how much he prefers it.

In the end, this book is about travel in the mind and heart and is more autobiography than travel writing. One final though McCarthy comes off as crabby as Paul Theroux does in his new book.

This is the ultimate irony as McCarthy greatly admires Theroux's work. Problem is that I'm not sure McCarthy has traveled enough or experienced enough to emulate that part of Theroux's writing!

Nov 15, Terric rated it it was ok. I read this because it was my book club's selection. I enjoyed the travel pieces. The "Do I want to marry the woman I've been living with - and have a daughter by?

I wanted to slap some sense into this self-indulgent idiot. What difference does a marriage license make when you have a kid and have been together that long?

What will change if you make it legal? Yet, he drags his feet and runs off to Patagonia, the Amazon and other exotic locales while trying to convi I read this because it was my book club's selection.

Yet, he drags his feet and runs off to Patagonia, the Amazon and other exotic locales while trying to convince himself to commit.

Once he finally decides he CAN get married, nothing will stand in his way, including his son's broken arm. Dec 03, Beth Schneider rated it it was amazing.

I had seen his byline in several Nat'l Geographic articles, but had never put it together with the Andrew McCarthy of '80s movie fame.

I'm just going to say that his writing skills completely overtake his acting skills. The way that he wove his personal story in with the landscape and people of the various locations he visited was thoroughly entertaining.

I'd highly recommend this book! Aug 08, Ti rated it liked it Shelves: books-sent-to-me , galleys-completed-edelweiss. He has an easy way about him and a likable face.

Needless to say, when this book came up for review, I jumped at the chance to read it. So, that is what he does. He climbs Kilimanjaro, spends some time in Costa Rica, Patagonia and Spain and all the while, D is waiting at home, touching base with him when she can.

As much as I adore McCarthy, I was frustrated with his tendency to flee every time decisions needed to be made. As a Brat Pack fan, my favorite parts of the book had to do with his movie career and how he came to play such iconic roles.

These parts are interspersed throughout the book and then of course he touches on alcoholism and how it nearly got the best of him.

Even here though, he only skims the surface. He only took things so far, and then just sort of gave in to them. BUT, for some reason, I still enjoyed the book.

It was refreshing for a man to discuss his weakness and I appreciated the honesty in his writing. For more reviews, visit my blog: Book Chatter.

View all 7 comments. Oct 25, Vera Marie rated it really liked it Shelves: travel-memoir. This travel memoir surprised me.

His biggest problem is marrying a woman he loves—the mother of his children—the woman whom he has been living with for seven years.

Once he gets to Patagonia and describes incidents and people—-I started to find the book enjoyable. Here is an excerpt from a really wonderful paragraph describing a ride across an Argentine lake and his feelings about it: The metamorphic rock glistens.

The boat passes a small blue iceberg—an orphan from the Upsala Glacier. I love the way he reveals his awe and vulnerability instead of presenting a cool, sophisticated demeanor.

Although he has not convinced me to love the soul-searching branch of travel memoir in general, and I could have done with less of existential angst and more of the travel stories, The Longest Way Home is well worth the read.

This is taken from a review I wrote at A Travler's Library. Read more. Mar 13, Sue Weiss rated it it was amazing. I'll be honest. I picked up this book when the author's name caught my eye and I wondered if it was the same Andrew McCarthy who was an actor in "St.

Elmo's Fire". A closer look at the cover photo confirmed that it was him so I chose it on a whim, not knowing what to expect.

I was surprised by how much I liked the book. At a loss to describe it precisely, but suffice it to say it is a cross between a memoir and a travelogue replete with descriptions of far-off REMOTE places, but intermixed is an I'll be honest.

At a loss to describe it precisely, but suffice it to say it is a cross between a memoir and a travelogue replete with descriptions of far-off REMOTE places, but intermixed is an in-depth look at the reasons why people travel and why we sometimes shun intimacy from those we love the most.

Even though the term "Brat Pack" was just a term made up for publicity reasons, I always felt somewhat connected to that group of actors from "St.

And I always identified best with the shy, sensitive character Andrew McCarthy played in the movie. After struggling with a drinking problem in real life, he lobbied hard to become a travel writer with a magazine and his descriptions of the places he's visited are unlike any others I've read.

His focus on what is to be gained from the uncertainties inherent in any made plans that often tend to go awry and his struggle to come to grips with his urge to commit to his girlfriend and enjoy the intimacy a marriage brings are interwoven throughout the book.

While I really enjoyed Sheedy's heartfelt look at her addiction and subsequent rehab, and delighted in Lowe's tell-all descriptions of his life in films, McCarthy's honestly told story is my favorite by far.

Jul 10, Casee Marie rated it really liked it. What results is something much more human, much more relatable: the story of a man with fears and the woman, the family, and the destinations who push him out of his comfort zone and into his ultimate happiness.

Read more Oct 30, Kevin Fanning added it Shelves: started-but-unfinished. Probably could have forced myself to finish it but it had to go back to the library.

It really annoyed me he couldn't just use her full name, or just make up a fake name, I mean who cares. Why the mystery? So basically Andrew McCarthy gets divorced and immediately launches into a relationship with Delores, and then has cold feet about their upcoming wedding and goes off to tour the world, leaving her with the kids and the wedding planning, ostensibly for his writing career but really just to "find himself".

I found it very irritating that he didn't just work his shit out in person with Dolores like a dude should, and that she would support his bullshit spirit quest while she door-matted it back home.

Presumably somewhere on his travels, perhaps high atop the Himalayas, he comes to terms with his needs and finds himself, realizing he no longer needs to chase after something ineffable when what he wanted, what he needed, was right there in front of him all along blah blah but like I say I didn't finish it.

Nov 06, Cara rated it liked it Shelves: about-real-people , fun-or-frivolity , life. This book is Pretty in Pink star Andrew McCarthy's reflections on his life, specifically the interactions between travel, his desire to marry the woman who would become his wife, and his desire to run away and be alone forever.

It's an interesting story, and the writing is good in a spare way. I got it because I thought understanding this guy's resistance to commitment and completely open intimacy might help me understand myself.

Do I really never want to get married again because I suck at it, This book is Pretty in Pink star Andrew McCarthy's reflections on his life, specifically the interactions between travel, his desire to marry the woman who would become his wife, and his desire to run away and be alone forever.

Do I really never want to get married again because I suck at it, or am I just afraid? What is this contradictory pull between wanting to be with people and wanting to be alone?

I'm not sure I really understand anything any better now than I did before reading the book. I do admire the author's efforts to lay himself bare here.

Reading it, I still felt a palpable distance from him, even as was clearly revealing his soul and his confusion. The distance almost went away entirely during the wedding chapter, though.

He does a good job of explaining himself as much as possible, even when it's clear that he seems contradictory and confusing even to himself.

Feb 25, Deirdre rated it really liked it. Andrew McCarthy is an actor I remember from my teenage years, a man who features on a few of my favourite movies.

So when I saw that he had a travel book that was about him dealing with his issues around marriage I was intrigued, when I read it I was charmed.

I do empathise with his feeling of being twitchy in crowds and lonely within groups, I know that feeling all too well myself. In this he explores being in foreign countries, actually working for the National Geographic Traveler, and recounti Andrew McCarthy is an actor I remember from my teenage years, a man who features on a few of my favourite movies.

In this he explores being in foreign countries, actually working for the National Geographic Traveler, and recounting some of his adventures, alongside his relationship with his now-wife and then-fiancee, and with his own issues and through these travels he comes to terms with himself and with his relationships with the people closest to him.

I enjoyed the read, loved the bits about dealing with his issues and with the wedding and D's dealings with him, which came across as very Irish without being twee.

I would recommend it. Not quite five star but damn close Jan 20, Kylan rated it really liked it.

There's something to be admired about a man who just unleashes all his honesty in a vulnerable and cautious way. Not so much a self-help book as oppose to an insight into a man who is trying to understand why his natural longing for separatism is conflicting with his impending marriage to a beautiful woman.

Andrew McCarthy is unflinchingly honest about his past, his present and his future. And whilst there is caution in his notes, McCarthy manages to intertwine his travels with his feelings and There's something to be admired about a man who just unleashes all his honesty in a vulnerable and cautious way.

And whilst there is caution in his notes, McCarthy manages to intertwine his travels with his feelings and fears about his home life.

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Translate review to English. Er scheint mir sehr von sich überzeugt, erzählt viel zu viel von seinen Frauengeschichten, in Step Up Revolution er scheinbar jede Gefühlt kann. November bis zum Kindle Cloud Reader Read instantly in your browser. Es ist der erste Schritt einer Wanderung, die durch China und Vorderasien bis ins heimische Bad Nenndorf in Norddeutschland führen soll. The book made me want Ned Bigby travel around Kazakhstan on foot. It also fits in my task of reading travel narratives in German. Geburtstags vor seine Wohnungstür in Beijing. I Harm Deutsch find myself enjoying reading this book so I didn't finish it. It was on that trip to Ireland, for my first writing assignment, that 15.17 To Paris met D Anime On Demand App only the second time, and we decided to spend our life together. A few years later, when the time came to apply to college, with few options Tiffany Trump of my poor grades, I quietly took the train to Hoboken, then the PATH under the Hudson River, and went to a building off Washington Square Adnan Maral Greenwich Village. Star: Christoph Rehage. But, man, this guy can write. Director: Christoph Rehage. It is his story. The Longest Way On the road, I'm forced to rely on instinct and intuition, on the kindness of strangers, in ways that illuminate who Mr Bones 2 German Stream am, ways that shed light on my motivations, my fears. He circled high above me twice and flew back over the horizon. Theodor W. Adorno filters. Not quite five star but damn close Edit Cast Credited cast: Lisa Maddox Read the in-depth story on my about page. He Sendun to Argentina and walks the glaciers, to Costa Rica, boats down the Amazon and eventually climbs Mt. See More Categories. This book is an awkward confessional, with the sometimes strident whines of an introverted curmudgeon.

And, yes, the guy from Pretty In Pink can write. More importantly, he can tell a story. View 1 comment.

Feb 06, Ryan Murdock rated it it was amazing. This is travel literature as it should be written. McCarthy has a fine eye for the details of place.

But this is far from just a story about exotic places. In fact, this reads more like a memoir. At the opening of the book, McCarthy finds himself at a major life crossroad.

Life has gotten in the way, but they finally set a date for their wedding. And then he panics and books a long string of writing assignments to the farthest places he can think of: Patagonia, the Amazon, the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica and Kilimanjaro.

Running away and pulling back has always come naturally to McCarthy. And in The Longest Way Home he tries to understand why.

In one sense he runs from his current life and responsibilities. But his deepest self seeks distance and solitude in order to journey deeper into himself.

It was his sense of solitude that I related to so strongly in this book. The tension between those two poles, and the quest to understand what it means, forms the core of his story.

It has taken me a long time to even understand what she means by that. And those poles are finally reconciled — at least for now — in the Dublin wedding scene that closes the book.

McCarthy has come to understand his walls, and the meaning of his solitude. And to reach beyond it. It is that place I first encountered as a child in my front yard, under the stars, it is the place from which I move out into the world, the place from which so much that is good in my life has sprung.

Over the years my willful isolation and separation, my urge to flee, my feelings of being misunderstood and ultimately alone in the world, all grew from a desire to shield that solitary place.

View all 4 comments. Dec 09, Julie Bestry rated it really liked it. I selected this book after hearing McCarthy interviewed on Studio on NPR and learning about his new career in travel writing.

This book is an awkward confessional, with the sometimes strident whines of an introverted curmudgeon. What right does Andrew McCarthy have to be so misanthropic?

He's pretty. He's rich. He's famous. He's overcome alcoholism, but so have millions of others. And then something happened. I can't say the book's early travel descriptions of Patagonia and the Amazon endeared me to him; in fact, it's almost like he put the most annoying aspects of himself up front, as if to scare off any readers not worthy of going to distance.

But as the book went on, I found myself cheering for him, for his wife and cobbled-together family and to the inevitable conclusion.

It's an indie movie starring Andrew McCarthy just waiting to happen. If you dislike self-doubt and self-indulgence, and confessional writing that tells too little to be explanatory and too much to invent your own meanings, this might be a bit much for you.

Had someone else written this, perhaps I'd have forgiven him his testiness. But in the end, I realized I hadn't skipped over a paragraph -- not a word-- and enjoyed myself.

The book takes the reader on quite the little journey. Mar 22, Jamee Zielke rated it liked it Shelves: book-club.

This book was a chore to read. Andrew McCarthy comes across as self-focused, which I suppose is unavoidable while writing a memoir of solo travel.

But still, he's a boor. We meet McCarthy, in literary form anyway, on his honeymoon for his 2nd marriage which he uses to set the scene for the many months between the decision to marry his now wife and the wedding itself.

We find out early on, in large part because he tells us, that he likes to be alone, has a hard time with commitment and obligation This book was a chore to read.

We find out early on, in large part because he tells us, that he likes to be alone, has a hard time with commitment and obligation, and is afraid to get married.

He is snobbish about many things: food, hotels, reading, music, etc. He is prone to anger and resentment and describes several situations in virtually all of his stories of becoming enraged.

Well that and his decision to spend the months leading up to his wedding away from his family traveling for the writing assignments he does for his travel writing career.

That were his idea. Partly so he could mentally prepare himself to marry the mother of one of his children and his girlfriend of I think he said 7 years.

He's also pretty comfortable just spilling whatever he thinks about whomever. I wouldn't want to read some of his thoughts if I was his now wife, father, etc.

Which I knew while he was still on his first exotic trip. But I waded through to the end, even though the deadline for book club came and went no one finished this book in our club, btw.

Couple of reasons. First is the train wreck factor. I like having something to respond to. Not in this book anyway -- his narrative flows well for the most part.

Third, as I pressed on, I did start thinking about how my own unedited writing might come across to others.

I'm a lot more calm than McCarthy and not nearly as snobby or prone to rage, but I don't have perfect thoughts all the time.

And some things that should be "easy" can be scary. So in that sense, he's relatable for me. I applaud that he put himself out there.

But I don't want to spend time with him. So would I recommend this? Not really. He is not likable in this context and his stories tell the same thing over and over again.

About him as an individual. I think this book would have been much better of he focused his writing on the destinations and what he saw, learned, and did to share the exotic locale with the reader.

His own mental exercises and struggles would have added to the stories. Instead, his focus on himself sucked the life out of what he had to say.

Jun 18, Robin rated it really liked it Shelves: narrative-nonfiction , memoir-autobio-bio , road-trip-books. It would be easy to dismiss this as a self-indulgent travel memoir by a former "brat-packer" actor became an award winning travel writer, but this was surprisingly well done.

I found the travels interesting and his musings of his fear of commitment to be honest there is much angst about getting hitched again and being a better husband than he was to his first wife.

Oct 16, Marc Weitz rated it really liked it. But, man, this guy can write. Indeed, Hemingway is mentioned a number of times in the book.

He recounts years of acting, failed relationships, and alcohol abuse. In this he realized the emptiness of it all.

He is a loner who desperately wants to be social and build lasting relationships, but while he yearns for this, he runs from it whenever he gets close.

It was one day hiking the Camino de Santiago in Spain that he realized the importance of travel in his life. From then on he sets himself on a career as a travel writer.

He approaches one of the editors from National Geographic seeking a job. Skeptical at first, he gave McCarthy a chance.

His logical side knows that D is the right woman for him, but his fears are preventing him from taking the leap and marrying her.

With each destination described in the book, he grows more comfortable and surer of his decision.

Now as an adult I continue to learn from his art and now him personally. Jan 06, Sara rated it liked it. Like most 80s fans, I've always had a particular soft spot for Andrew McCarthy.

He's been fairly absent from the screen in recent years and I was pleasantly surprised to find he'd become something of a travel writer in the interim.

Travel writing with a side of self-discovery isn't my favourite kind of writing but I was intrigued by this book. Furthermore one of my colleagues told me that he'd worked with McCarthy on this in a publicity capacity and that McCarthy was pretty much exactly as he Like most 80s fans, I've always had a particular soft spot for Andrew McCarthy.

Furthermore one of my colleagues told me that he'd worked with McCarthy on this in a publicity capacity and that McCarthy was pretty much exactly as he seemed in his most iconic roles Pretty in Pink, Class, St Elmo's Fire, I'm assuming not Weekend at Bernies , if not more so - in other words, he WAS still waters run deep.

So I treated myself for Christmas. The book itself is an easy, enjoyable read, weaving exotic destinations like Patagonia and Kilimanjaro with McCarthy's concerns about getting married for the second time and reflections on family life.

It didn't change my life or anything but I enjoyed the feeling of getting to know McCarthy better - he really opens up, and he has an eloquent way of doing so.

My one complaint is that he says very little about working on Pretty in Pink - but he does include a picture in the plate section.

Nov 14, Florinda rated it liked it. But when they finally began talking about wedding plans, he grew anxious and conflicted.

I think the struggle was more about intimacy and boundaries, combined with the concern of the once-divorced person not to end up a twice-divorced person.

I was pretty sympathetic. The book itself seems to reflect some of those intimacy-and-boundaries struggles. Jan 02, Greg Baerg rated it it was amazing.

I didn't know that Andrew McCarthy was a travel writer until a friend read a feature he wrote about an unconventional stay in Paris.

She recommended the book to me and I am grateful. As the title suggests, it is more than a travel book -- indeed, it isn't a travel book, at all.

It is a heartwarming story about a man coming to grips with who he has been and who is becoming, and the journey that got him there and which continues.

At this point of my life, it spoke to me, and I found myself highlig I didn't know that Andrew McCarthy was a travel writer until a friend read a feature he wrote about an unconventional stay in Paris.

At this point of my life, it spoke to me, and I found myself highlighting passages and really wanting to know how his story unfolded, rather than ended.

There is more, of course, that means more to me than probably most, like how he is a divorced man with a young son, figuring out how that dynamic works in a new relationship.

It was hopeful. And as an aside, I read the Kindle edition and was pleasantly surprised that all the photos and there weren't that many, really were at the end.

While they were brief and not "travel" photos in the least, I appreciated being able to use his rather vivid and unique descriptions to visualize each stop, rather than have a photo paint the picture for me.

I am thankful to my friend for the recommendation and can't wait to discuss this book with her, once her journey brings us together again.

Dec 03, Megan rated it did not like it. I was surprised to find out Andrew McCarthy was a travel writer.

After reading pages of this book I am shocked he is a travel writer. I love reading about people traveling to far away places and seeing amazing things.

So while the author travels to cool places the way he writes gave it no life for me and I found myself skipping through the pages hoping to get to something interesting.

As for his relationship with D, there was nothing in it to make me root for them. At pages what I know about D through his eyes is: she doesn't like living in NY and complains about it often, she enjoys to socialize and doesn't understand why he doesn't causing a point of constant friction, and he has given up trying to understand her train of thought when she sees signs in things because it is not rational.

The relationship was so volatile that his son from a previous marriage didn't want to visit. Seriously, everytime he spoke of D, I felt like he was rolling his eyes at her.

Oct 03, Larry H rated it really liked it. I'm not at all ashamed to admit that I was first drawn to Andrew McCarthy's new book because he starred in two of my favorite 80s movies, St.

Elmo's Fire and Pretty in Pink. The truth is, however, about a year or so ago I read an article he wrote on Ireland for Bon Appetit magazine, and I remembered being impressed with his writing ability.

While I may have come to McCarthy's book partially because of my nostalgia for most 80s-related things, it was his writing ability, and his insights into the I'm not at all ashamed to admit that I was first drawn to Andrew McCarthy's new book because he starred in two of my favorite 80s movies, St.

While I may have come to McCarthy's book partially because of my nostalgia for most 80s-related things, it was his writing ability, and his insights into the appeal of travel and why he is more comfortable being alone—even while surrounded by strangers—that made me keep reading.

But don't be taken in by the quote from Elizabeth Gilbert on the book's cover—while McCarthy meditates on love and relationships, and does eat throughout the book, this is no male version of Eat, Pray, Love.

He recounts always being a somewhat ambivalent person; while he initially fell in love with acting in high school and felt truly alive onstage, he never really imagined himself a successful actor, and once his career started taking off, he found himself at odds with this success.

It's interesting to find out the characteristics that most intrigued me about McCarthy's acting—his ambivalence, his vulnerability, his shyness—were actually real-life personality traits, not dimensions of his characters.

At one point he recounts that he saw acting as a terrific way to meet women, travel, and drink to excess. At a crossroads in his life, and at risk of jeopardizing his future by alienating the woman he loves, he sets out to try and find the answer to what causes his fear of commitment, of showing his true self to people.

He begins traveling to places both exotic and remote—the glaciers of Patagonia, the rainforests of Costa Rica, the heart of Amazonian country, Mt.

Kilimanjaro, even one of his best friend's childhood hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. This book is part travelogue, as he shares risky adventures, breathtaking sights, and encounters both enriching and bizarre with the people he meets along his journey, and part memoir of self-discovery.

McCarthy says, "In life there are dividing lines. These moments become a way to chart our time; they are the signposts for our lives.

Andrew McCarthy is a writer with great talent, one who truly made the anecdotes of his travels come alive, and his use of imagery really evoked pictures in my mind.

But at times, McCarthy's ambivalence, his reticence to disclose his feelings, even to the woman he loves, was a little frustrating.

You almost want to shake him from time to time, to warn him he needs to find his answers quickly or his whole life could fall apart.

That melodrama aside, this is an insightful, enjoyable book that makes you see travel, and why people do it, in a very different way.

Jan 13, Heather rated it it was ok Shelves: This is a pretty self-indulgent and repetitive look at McCarthy's journey to finally marrying the mother of one of his children.

While there's a good concept here--him running away in search of something and finding that he has what he needs and wants at home--he never actually digs deep enough to make the reader care.

He repeats over and over and over how he craves solitude, how he has always felt apart from people, how he is embarrassed by his own and other people's shame.

But rather than en This is a pretty self-indulgent and repetitive look at McCarthy's journey to finally marrying the mother of one of his children.

Each insight is kind of half-formed, which makes me think he didn't really learn anything, just got lucky in finding the right people to indulge him.

More like 3. There are travel sections that make me want to visit the place the next day. There are deep insightful sections that make me want to write down each word of wisdom to read everyday.

There are pages about family that make me want to put the book down and go hug my wife and kids. There are sections that bored the heck out of me.

However, the others far outweigh the More like 3. However, the others far outweigh the slow parts. McCarthy, as an author, is a great surprise.

I recommend it anyone who likes to travel but has frequently asked the question why. The book is really an introspective look at his withdrawal from life and the use of travel as a means to try to understand himself and deal with his problems.

I think my greatest frustration was the description of his second wedding. Weeks before his Irish wedding, he takes off on travel assignments to Patagonia and the Amazon, arriving just days before leaving for Ireland.

Planning is clearly not one of his strengths, preferring a seat-of-the-pants approach to life and travel. To be fair, the craziness of planning deficiencies was shared equally by both he and his wife!

Aug 19, Anna Janelle rated it really liked it Shelves: first-reads , advanced-reader-copy. My previous status updates seem to encompass many of the gut-reactions that I've had to this book.

I was pleasantly surprised to discover how well Andrew McCarthy can spin a tale. He's a wonderfully gifted writer who possesses the ability to really draw the reader in to reassess and re-evaluate what it means to become an adult member of a committed relationship.

While McCarthy was primarily known as an celebrated "Brat Pack" actor in the s, he is now a celebrated travel author, acting as edi My previous status updates seem to encompass many of the gut-reactions that I've had to this book.

While McCarthy was primarily known as an celebrated "Brat Pack" actor in the s, he is now a celebrated travel author, acting as editor-at-large for the National Geographic Traveler.

While this book was advertised as a travel memoir, it became, for me, most importantly, a memoir discussing McCarthy's fears and inhibitions regarding his second marriage.

I found myself most emotionally connected to his memories centering around his unresolved issues with his family - in particular, his father.

I found McCarthy to be most profound and moving when illustrating his family dynamic - as opposed to discussing the exotic scenery of an exotic locale.

The travel narrative serves a purpose in that it prompts McCarthy's inner dialogue and self-revelation. As a reader new to the travel genre, this was a perfect manner in which to get my feet wet while combining the narrative with memoir or autobiography, a genre which I am most familiar.

It's a very personal encounter with issues and questions that plague us all as we transition from youth into adulthood. As a person currently struggling to plan a wedding like McCarthy and his betrothed D.

It was a quick, relatively short read that I thoroughly enjoyed. Who would have thought this cutie would have grown up to be a man with such insight into affection and self-knowledge?

Respectfully, I was very surprised at the quality and emotional-impact of his insight. A very welcome surprise indeed Oct 31, Gatamadrizgmail.

He has been with D for seven years, they have a daughter and everything should be fine, right? But the minute they decide to get married he is off and running.

Painfully shy and a bit socially inept, he is honest that he uses travel to avoid getting to know people. But travel also gives him the opportunity to take a real look at himself.

So this book balances between an intimate look at where this man is at, and a tautly written, imaginative travelogue. He travels to Argentina and walks the glaciers, to Costa Rica, boats down the Amazon and eventually climbs Mt.

But the reader gets it. You really feel for him, for his incredibly patient wife. You laugh at the foibles of travel, and especially traveling with kids.

The descriptions of the places are spectacular - I found myself googling images of Calafate in Argentina, for example and immediately wanted to go there.

Memories of his living in Vienna and Dublin, his times as the Movie Star are woven into his journeys. McCarthy is an award-winning travel writer, and it shows in the imagery.

When he finally comes to the realization that he does not need this crutch anymore, that he wants to be back in New York with his wife and children, he is on top of Mt.

Kilimanjaro you want to cheer. The final scene of him dancing wildly at his wedding, free of his self-doubts, enjoying himself with people for the first time in his life is moving and wonderful.

I cannot say enough about this book. Andrew McCarthy has transformed himself from Brat Pack actor to travel writer.

His work has received some high honors. I was aware of his work in National Geographic Traveller, so I picked up this book. By clicking 'Sign me up' I acknowledge that I have read and agree to the privacy policy and terms of use.

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The Longest Way - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Report abuse. Piye Yuan rated it it was amazing Dec 18, Dass manchmal der Weg spannender als das Ziel ist, wissen wir spätestens seit "Forrest Gump". The book is in German so I have to return it back to Amazon and get the refund. War schon interessant zu lesen, aber was mich persönlich interessiert hätte, kam leider zu kurz: Gespräche Watch Box App den vielen Leuten, denen er begegnet. So I definitely work on my relationships, holding on to them as hard as I can, hoping that they would last a long Prominent Bedeutung, even though I don't believe in forever. Wenn er darüber geschrieben hätte, was er mit den Leuten geredet hat bzw was das für Leute waren und Christine Perfekt War Gestern sie leben, hätte man sicher einen ganz guten Eindruck über die Kultur Maigret Filme Stream Mentalität der Chinesen bekommen. Sehr schade fand ich, dass nur in der Mitte des Buches auf ein paar Seiten Fotos der Reise abgedruckt sind. Was this review helpful to you? Verified Purchase. Amazon Second Chance Pass it on, trade it in, give it a second life. The Longest Way The Longest Way Feb 01, Thomas Wickinghoff rated Kino Tipps liked it. Rating details. Entstanden ist ein persönliches, eindringliches Buch. Dann, in Deutschland, kamen die Verlage. What makes it feel a lot less like a great adventure is, that he's apparently a "little rich brat" - I mean, he's a student Karim Köster already spent months of his Hamburg Heute wandering from Paris to Bad Nenndorf instead of earning Movie4k.Sc apparently and now - still without work - plans to wander for several years, while staying Titanik Film hotels, eating in Cineplex Schlosstheater and making trips Tracers Stream Movie4k plane back and forth. Anyway, this book covers not the whole trip from Beijing to Germany, but rather, just the first kilometers from Bei You probably have seen a video in YouTube of a German guy Kuroshitsuji Stream decided to walk from Beijing to Germany. Wie Schnappschüsse reiht Christoph Rehage Landschaftsdetails, Gespräche, historische Exkurse und bizarre Beobachtungen aneinander - so vielseitig und interessant wie das Land selbst. Er scheint mir sehr von sich überzeugt, erzählt viel zu viel Perfect Gir seinen Frauengeschichten, in der er scheinbar jede haben kann. Refresh and try again. This is not a strict '1 picture a day' video, since there are many instances Second In Command several shots have been taken on the same occasion. Auf jeden Fall hat mir das Buch ein paar neue Einblicke in die chinesische Welt gegeben. The longest Way - Kilometer zu Fuß durch China book. Read 14 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Mit 30 Kilo Ausrüstung und eine. THE LONGEST WAY. Kilometer zu Fuss durch China. Zum Geburtstag macht sich Christoph Rehage selbst das schönste Geschenk: Nach seinem.

The Longest Way - Ein Blick ins Buch

Anyway, this book covers not the whole trip from Beijing to Germany, but rather, just the first kilometers from Bei You probably have seen a video in YouTube of a German guy who decided to walk from Beijing to Germany. Get A Copy.

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